Purfylle: Carnaby's Black Cockatoo

Recent Posts

Sunday, 6 September 2015

Carnaby's Black Cockatoo

female Carnaby's black cockatoo


We had Carnaby's black cockatoo's visit! 

Locally Carnaby's cockatoo's are commonly called 'white tails'.

female Carnaby's black cockatoo can be identified by her grey eye rings and pale beak

Whit tails don't visit very often and they are rarer then the forest red tail black cockatoo which are threatened.

about to take flight

Carnaby's cockatoo's are so much rarer in fact that they are listed as "fauna that is rare or is likely to become extinct" by Western Australia's Wildlife Conservation Act. Another endangered species along with animals such as the bonobo, snow leopard and both the hyacinth and lear's macaw.

white tale black cockatoo

folding her wings away after flight

Carnaby's cockatoo looking for lunch

female white tale black cockatoo or Caranaby's cockatoo

The males have a dark beak and pink eye rings whilst females have a pale beak, grey eye rings and paler ear patches.

male Carnaby's cockatoo

pink eye rings identify this black cockatoo as male

sweet flowers for lunch

female Carnaby's black cockatoo aka white tail

47 comments:

  1. What a great bird and how lucky to have spotted him!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I do enjoy seeing your native birds :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Western Australia certainly seems to have more then it's fair share of beauties. The Eastern States tend to miss out a bit.

      Delete
  3. The birds that visit you are a lot prettier than the ones that visit us

    Thank you for linking up

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for hosting #mysundayphoto http://onedad3girls.com/my-sunday-photo/

      Delete
  4. stunning photos and great contrast with the black and the red of the bottle brush

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love when the bottle brush is at it's brightest, the birds do too, I guess because it's at it's tastiest.

      Delete
  5. Wow that is not something you see every day, Clio lending a helping hand for Coombe Mill

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It truly isn't. I hope we do continue to at least have the chance to see.

      Delete
  6. these are beautiful shots stella of beautiful birds. it is so sad that they are so rare. when will we ever learn? like the koala habitat they are about to bulldoze down at ballina. the pollies and developers don't give a rat's....grrrr

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. At least they didn't get to ruin the Great Barrier Reef. It makes me so mad!

      Delete
  7. I love this bird! He looks so handsome and you captured him beautifully! #mysundayphoto

    ReplyDelete
  8. Stunning captures, what a gorgeous bird! These are lovely Stella! - Tasha

    ReplyDelete
  9. Cockatoos are such lovely birds. We get sulphur crested, white cockatoos in our back garden all the time. Yesterday we saw a black cockatoo while we were out cycling. It was a red-tail. It was all alone and looked like it was being chased by a currawong so I think it may have been injured or lost, poor thing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The red tail is probably a youngster that's been kicked out of it's nest to go and make it's own way in the world. At this time of year currawong's and magpies are nesting so will chase off anyone who might attract birds of prey that could be a threat to their young. So I wouldn't worry, it all sounds pretty normal for this time of year. Keep an eye out and you might get to see your cocky with a mate soon if it's lucky! ;)

      Delete
  10. Beautiful birds. You captured some amazing shots.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Look at him show off!!!
    Great photos here.
    Thanks for linking up at http://image-in-ing.blogspot.com/2015/09/allium-glorious.html

    ReplyDelete
  12. That's so cool! I've only ever seen cockatoos in pet stores and zoos. It would be really exciting to see one in the wild. Good thing you had a camera nearby :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I must say the first time I saw one in the wild I was mesmerised, it's such a different experience to them being in a cage. They like to throw things at you =D

      Delete
  13. How pretty, with the different color eye rings. White tailis the perfect name. God made such amazing creations.
    Melinda

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Now I've just got to remember which is which! At least I can come back and check here if I forget ;0)

      Delete
    2. Hey you're commenting with your blog name showing now!! =D woot woot

      Delete
  14. Such an exotic bird. It's hard for me to imagine them in the wild - the only time they're seen here is in cages, which is a sad thing. It would be thrilling for me to see them in the wild.
    I hope you will come link up at http://image-in-ing.blogspot.com/2015/09/allium-glorious.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are incredible to watch in the wild. I wish you could see them too. I've linked this post previously but I shall have a new one on Sunday and will link that one up. (I've been totally failing on the linky front lately. I really appreciate you coming and giving me a nudge)

      Delete
  15. He's quite handsome! You are so fortunate to have him visit and he seems to be happy posing for you, too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are such a rare visitor I'm ever so pleased he came to visit.

      Delete
  16. That's an amazing bird, and incredible that you got to photograph him. Your photos are amazing!

    ReplyDelete
  17. What handsome birds! I have a friend who has several big birds - although I have no idea what they are (they look like your babies there - not like macaws).

    Thank you for sharing these guys with us at Photo Friday!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'd love to see your friends birds. I'm really curious as to what breed they are now.

      Delete
  18. What a beauty! I will like one of those visits (it is not going to happen in California). On top of that, the guy have pink eyes (ha!). That is awesome.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Perhaps you could visit the birds here in Western Australia ;) I love that the boys get the pink too.

      Delete
  19. Replies
    1. If only you could see them in the flesh!

      Delete
  20. Never seen before.... Fantastic captures!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm not surprised, most Australians haven't seem them either!

      Delete