Perfect Granny Square Crochet Pattern

Learn how to create a seam free, single sided Crochet Granny square for perfect results every time.

The humble Granny Square is the crochet staple of Nanna's everywhere, which is how it came to be known as a 'Granny Square'. Originally it was just called a crochet square.

The Granny Square is often the very first thing we are taught when learning to crochet, so it would follow that it would be simple to have a perfect square every time and those new to crochet often get discouraged when this is not the case.

However, to get a perfect square actually requires a bit of experience, good fundamentals and advanced row starting techniques, otherwise you are left with seams, the reverse side of stitches showing every second row or even a slight spiral effect.

This granny square is made without turning your work and has a right and a wrong side.

Tampico Bustle

You may have noticed two missing dimensions in my previous post, waist and length.  I did some guess work on ruffle lengths, referenced some other bustle pads and used my own waist as a bit of a guesstimate, but a bit more bustle research showed up this image of the 1886 Tampico bustle on Pinterest. I haven't found a source for the image yet.
Tampico Daisy Bustle 1886


A bit more searching and I found a reference to the Tampico bustle in the 'Strawbridge & Clothier's quarterly 1882' (which turns out to be an absolute wealth of information), and includes a listing for the Tampico bustle with length! Win!

Tampico Bustle from Strawbridge & Clothier's quarterly 1882
No. 50.—Pleated Tampico Bustle
 seven rows of pleating side pieces
 length 12 inches. Price, 90c.

Strawbridge & Clothier's quarterly 1882 lists 7 rows of pleats not 6 like the one at the Met Museum, but I call that close enough to work from, besides 12 inches divides by 6 really nicely.

This pin does not cite references either however I am including it for completeness.

If you have any more information on the Tampico Bustle do share!

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