Which Stitch Markers Are Best

When I first took up crochet I didn't have any stitch markers, I didn't even know stitch markers existed. It wasn't long before I knew about them and I learnt the value of using stitch markers, aka stitch savers. That first frustrating experience of when a project accidentally unravels because there's nothing holding onto the stitch to stop it coming undone or your crochet circle grows in ways it isn't supposed to and the worth of this tiny tool became obvious very quickly. But there are so many styles of stitch marker to choose from, locking, circle, coil-less, plastic, safety pins, thread, 3D printed... does it really make a difference which one you use? Is it just how pretty they are? I walk you through a dozen different stitch markers from items you have lying around your home to the fancy artisan styles. I share with you what features to look for and those that don't really hold up to the task.

Pillow Lace Cushions

Before I could make my own bobbin lace kit I had to decide what type of pillow lace cushion I wanted.

There are quite a few styles of lace making pillows and I had no idea what the differences were, but what was obvious to me was that some were flat and some were cylinders for making long braids and laces. A few 'bobbin lace cushion' searches later and I thought I needed a pretty antique* roller cushion style set-up, and I wasn't swayed by how pretty they were at all.


Well, yeah Ok, maybe the prettiness did sway me just a little.

Both of these lovelies I found on Pinterest. The little draw for keeping spare pins, bobbins and lace patterns, the care gone into decorating the wood, I just love that they are beautiful as well a functional.

So I set about making one.

*Modern roller pillows are a cross between a flat pillow and cylinder pillow offering you the best of both but the antique ones are more cylinder and don't offer as much flat working space.






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