Which Stitch Markers Are Best

When I first took up crochet I didn't have any stitch markers, I didn't even know stitch markers existed. It wasn't long before I knew about them and I learnt the value of using stitch markers, aka stitch savers. That first frustrating experience of when a project accidentally unravels because there's nothing holding onto the stitch to stop it coming undone or your crochet circle grows in ways it isn't supposed to and the worth of this tiny tool became obvious very quickly. But there are so many styles of stitch marker to choose from, locking, circle, coil-less, plastic, safety pins, thread, 3D printed... does it really make a difference which one you use? Is it just how pretty they are? I walk you through a dozen different stitch markers from items you have lying around your home to the fancy artisan styles. I share with you what features to look for and those that don't really hold up to the task.

2 Ways to Store Paper Patterns

I make a lot of my own paper patterns. I prefer not to fold patterns if I can.


For large skirts and dresses, pattern drafts, pattern nests and anything really large I roll it up and store it upright.



Patterns with small pieces I store in plastic envelopes in arch lever files. I've tried many different ways over the years and this method keeps them clean, but full of folds. 

Sometimes I'll roll up a pattern but file the facings, plackets, pockets etc.

I'd love to have everything beautifully labelled, maybe one day. My patterns are getting to the stage where I probably need to create an index of some sort.

How do you store your patterns?

Comments

  1. That is a great idea! the patterns I make are pinned to a corkboard. I may make room on my newly-built shelving and store them the way you do!

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    Replies
    1. I've had one too many cat chewed (and worse) patterns over the years, and this has been the most successful system so far but I have run out of shelf space. Enjoy your new shelves!

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