Perfect Granny Square Crochet Pattern

Learn how to create a seam free, single sided Crochet Granny square for perfect results every time.

The humble Granny Square is the crochet staple of Nanna's everywhere, which is how it came to be known as a 'Granny Square'. Originally it was just called a crochet square.

The Granny Square is often the very first thing we are taught when learning to crochet, so it would follow that it would be simple to have a perfect square every time and those new to crochet often get discouraged when this is not the case.

However, to get a perfect square actually requires a bit of experience, good fundamentals and advanced row starting techniques, otherwise you are left with seams, the reverse side of stitches showing every second row or even a slight spiral effect.

This granny square is made without turning your work and has a right and a wrong side.

My Sunday Shot 17

glochidia
ISO 100 | f 5.7 | 1/400
lens 50-250mm 

Comments

  1. this is superb stella. i love it. prickly pear? they have ripped out most of it along the highways here. there used to be heaps.

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    1. Well spotted! You're so good with your plant and animal knowledge. It's everywhere over here still. I wouldn't like to have the job of ripping it out. I wonder if they had to burn them after ripping them out to stop them from growing?

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  2. I actually looked up "purfyelle" in the dictionary--I guess I will have to tool around your blog a bit more to figure out what it means. Love the cactus, BTW.

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    1. Purfylle means 'to embellish' and used to be used in a myriad of ways to describe everything from embellishment such as embroidery to decorative architectural features. The spelling has changed a lot over time and today is mostly commonly spelt purfil and is used to describe the pretty scroll work on violins. The spelling with a y and double l is rather old fashioned. You can find out more on the Purfylle about page :o) I'm so excited you were curious!

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  3. Prickly pear! I made myself so ill on these as a teen touring in Africa, bad memories!

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    1. Oh dear! You must have enjoyed them at first.

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  4. Lovely photo. I have never heard of prickly pear

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    1. They're part of the opuntia family which is the cactus for growing the cochineal insect.

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  5. Amazing detail, I love the contrast in colours

    Thank you for linking up

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  6. Pretty. Nicely shot macro of a prickly pear!
    Thank you for sharing at http://image-in-ing.blogspot.com/2015/03/flying-high.html

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  7. Cool. Are they flowers or berries.

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    1. They're a fruit about the size of a small plum

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  8. Replies
    1. If you're brave enough to get past all the nasty glochids in the skin they are very nice to eat.

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  9. Lovely color highlighted by that good weather =)

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  10. These are really tasty and consistency of a fir kiwi.

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    1. I've only eaten dragon fruit before, the glochids on these are just too intimidating. I'm sure there's a trick to it.

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  11. Great photo. I,too, looked up the definition of your title.... happy that you explained it to Brooke. Enjoy your day!

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    1. I'm on a mission to bring purfylle back into common use!

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