Perfect Granny Square Crochet Pattern

Learn how to create a seam free, single sided Crochet Granny square for perfect results every time.

The humble Granny Square is the crochet staple of Nanna's everywhere, which is how it came to be known as a 'Granny Square'. Originally it was just called a crochet square.

The Granny Square is often the very first thing we are taught when learning to crochet, so it would follow that it would be simple to have a perfect square every time and those new to crochet often get discouraged when this is not the case.

However, to get a perfect square actually requires a bit of experience, good fundamentals and advanced row starting techniques, otherwise you are left with seams, the reverse side of stitches showing every second row or even a slight spiral effect.

This granny square is made without turning your work and has a right and a wrong side.

Winter Blooms

insects feasting on a grevillea

  Even in mid-winter we are lucky enough to get some pretty blooms.


Grevillea hybrid with unusual cream flowers

Grevillea flowers come in a wide range of shapes and colours, usually in pink, oranges and reds, this cream coloured one is less common.

A confused rose flowering in the middle of winter

Roses are a popular ornamental and can be found in gardens everywhere.

Pale saffron coloured grevillea

Grevillea's could almost be called the Australian Rose, originally just a wildflower, new bright coloured hybrids are discovered in the nursery's every year and almost every garden has one.

Comments

  1. what an interesting flower. never seen one, that I recall.

    ReplyDelete
  2. What a lovely selection of pictures, I love the white rose. Popping over from #mysundayphoto

    ReplyDelete
  3. What beautiful flowers, I love the colours, Clio lending a helping hand for Coombe Mill

    ReplyDelete
  4. What a unique and beautiful flower.

    Thank you for linking up

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The birds love them because they produce so much nectar.

      Delete
  5. What a wonderful photos! You have captured so much detail!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's the details that make these flowers interesting I think.

      Delete
  6. Unique flowers and AWESOME photos!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Winnie =D You might be interested to know that the nectar from these flowers was used in cooking by the Aboriginals.

      Delete
  7. I love those flowers! And that you got a bee on one of them. I can't seem to snap a bee shot not matter how hard I try. (I don't try too hard...). We have a crazy rose bush. It's been giving us yellowish, whiteish, pinkish flowers for years then BAM! Red. We found out that most rose bushes are red and the lighter colors get graphed (?) onto the red ones because red is hardier. After extreme seasons the base bush can push through. Long story longer, we now have a red and white rose bush.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bee shots are a challenge and you do need patience - and a fast shutter speed - TV 2000 should do it. I had a beautiful rose bush that was red & white stripped roses but it didn't survive overzealous husbands re-loction of said bush. You'r bush sounds amazing. I hope we get to see pretty photos of it next time it's in bloom.

      Delete
  8. Beautiful flowers. I think I am going to have to be more observant around here for some winter flowers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They really brighten up the week when the sky is gloom and rain.

      Delete
  9. Lovely photos.
    Thank you for sharing at https://image-in-ing.blogspot.com/2016/06/lovely-san-juan.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Sue, it's great to be linking back up again.

      Delete
  10. A very interesting plant and lovely photos Stella.

    Thanks for visiting 'Wildlife Watching with FAB'. In response to your comment I don't currently own a dedicated macro lens so all my wildlife photography is taken using a Cannon 70-300mm plus a 1.4x converter.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've used my 55mm-250mm lens for macro's before without a converter and it's a challenge. I do have a my 17mm-70mm lens though for macro shots and it serves me well. The pair pretty much are my entire photography kit. I 'borrowed' (rather permanently) the 17-70mm from my husbands equipment. Does your 70-300mm have autofocus? I'm continually frustrated by the limits of my long lens but love the lightness for long walks.

      Delete
  11. They look like noodles! I love this flower though it makes me crave for some ramen =)

    #mysundayphoto

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, I think you can eat them but the won't taste like ramen, very sweet.

      Delete
  12. Well these are very lovely :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They certainly help to brighten a cold day =D

      Delete

Post a Comment