Which Stitch Markers Are Best

When I first took up crochet I didn't have any stitch markers, I didn't even know stitch markers existed. It wasn't long before I knew about them and I learnt the value of using stitch markers, aka stitch savers. That first frustrating experience of when a project accidentally unravels because there's nothing holding onto the stitch to stop it coming undone or your crochet circle grows in ways it isn't supposed to and the worth of this tiny tool became obvious very quickly. But there are so many styles of stitch marker to choose from, locking, circle, coil-less, plastic, safety pins, thread, 3D printed... does it really make a difference which one you use? Is it just how pretty they are? I walk you through a dozen different stitch markers from items you have lying around your home to the fancy artisan styles. I share with you what features to look for and those that don't really hold up to the task.

Rainbow Lorikeets

Rainbow Lorikeet Pair
I was so engrossed in designing a crochet edging yesterday I completely forgot to share my weekend photo. I hope it was worth the wait.

This gorgeous little parrot is a rainbow lorikeet. They are inquisitive and bold. Most tame birds that escape their aviary will perish in the wild, not these pioneering little rascals, they will happily set up camp and flourish. That is how they came to become Western Australian locals.


Rainbow Lorikeet exiting a nesting tree hollow

Rainbow Lorikeet guarding it's nest

Rainbow Lorikeet guarding it's nest

Comments

  1. Hi Stella, in my humble opinion they were well worth the wait! What beautiful birds you have in Australia, the prettiest bird I've seen here apart from peacocks is a Hoopoe, which flitted off into dusk just as I slowly produced my camera!

    xx

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    1. I had to search for Hoopoe and that is one pretty bird!

      I can't even count how many times a bird has disappeared on me while I try to get my camera ready.

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  2. O, that is nice. This birds here only are in the ZOO. Thank you so much. #image-in-ing

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    1. You need a lot of trees to have birds living nearby, it is one of the great things about Western Australia but there is a great deal of knocking them down to make way for the humans. I fear birds will only be seen at the zoo here soon aswell.

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  3. Gorgeous. And the beautiful subtle colors and textures of the trees are the perfect foil for the birds.

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    1. The bark on our trees is so variable which does make for some brightly coloured bird life.

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  4. So very beautiful!! Are they related to para"keets"?

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    1. Both parakeets and lorikeets are parrots but they are also quite different. For starters, lori's have hairy tongues to help them get nectar from flowers whereas most parrots don't.

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  5. Fascinating! We don't have anything quite so exotic here. Glad I had the opportunity today to visit, and that you shared at http://image-in-ing.blogspot.com/2016/09/up-up-away.html

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  6. I remember when I first saw a whole tree of them in Brisbane. I was surprised because I'd only seen birds like that in pet stores or at theme parks! cheers, kidcandoodle

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  7. So cool! Are they loud squawkers? Around here we have Quaker parrots, and a flock of them can cause quite a racket. Your lorikeets look very similar, but so much prettier with those colors!

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  8. They are absolutely gorgeous!

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  9. Very pretty! The trees are pretty cool too! Have a great week!
    http://travelingbugwiththreeboys-kelleyn.blogspot.com/2016/10/october.html

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