Perfect Granny Square Crochet Pattern

Learn how to create a seam free, single sided Crochet Granny square for perfect results every time.

The humble Granny Square is the crochet staple of Nanna's everywhere, which is how it came to be known as a 'Granny Square'. Originally it was just called a crochet square.

The Granny Square is often the very first thing we are taught when learning to crochet, so it would follow that it would be simple to have a perfect square every time and those new to crochet often get discouraged when this is not the case.

However, to get a perfect square actually requires a bit of experience, good fundamentals and advanced row starting techniques, otherwise you are left with seams, the reverse side of stitches showing every second row or even a slight spiral effect.

This granny square is made without turning your work and has a right and a wrong side.

Rainbow Lorikeets

Rainbow Lorikeet Pair
I was so engrossed in designing a crochet edging yesterday I completely forgot to share my weekend photo. I hope it was worth the wait.

This gorgeous little parrot is a rainbow lorikeet. They are inquisitive and bold. Most tame birds that escape their aviary will perish in the wild, not these pioneering little rascals, they will happily set up camp and flourish. That is how they came to become Western Australian locals.


Rainbow Lorikeet exiting a nesting tree hollow

Rainbow Lorikeet guarding it's nest

Rainbow Lorikeet guarding it's nest

Comments

  1. Hi Stella, in my humble opinion they were well worth the wait! What beautiful birds you have in Australia, the prettiest bird I've seen here apart from peacocks is a Hoopoe, which flitted off into dusk just as I slowly produced my camera!

    xx

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    1. I had to search for Hoopoe and that is one pretty bird!

      I can't even count how many times a bird has disappeared on me while I try to get my camera ready.

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  2. O, that is nice. This birds here only are in the ZOO. Thank you so much. #image-in-ing

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    1. You need a lot of trees to have birds living nearby, it is one of the great things about Western Australia but there is a great deal of knocking them down to make way for the humans. I fear birds will only be seen at the zoo here soon aswell.

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  3. Gorgeous. And the beautiful subtle colors and textures of the trees are the perfect foil for the birds.

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    1. The bark on our trees is so variable which does make for some brightly coloured bird life.

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  4. So very beautiful!! Are they related to para"keets"?

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    1. Both parakeets and lorikeets are parrots but they are also quite different. For starters, lori's have hairy tongues to help them get nectar from flowers whereas most parrots don't.

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  5. Fascinating! We don't have anything quite so exotic here. Glad I had the opportunity today to visit, and that you shared at http://image-in-ing.blogspot.com/2016/09/up-up-away.html

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  6. I remember when I first saw a whole tree of them in Brisbane. I was surprised because I'd only seen birds like that in pet stores or at theme parks! cheers, kidcandoodle

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  7. So cool! Are they loud squawkers? Around here we have Quaker parrots, and a flock of them can cause quite a racket. Your lorikeets look very similar, but so much prettier with those colors!

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  8. They are absolutely gorgeous!

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  9. Very pretty! The trees are pretty cool too! Have a great week!
    http://travelingbugwiththreeboys-kelleyn.blogspot.com/2016/10/october.html

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