Perfect Granny Square Crochet Pattern

Learn how to create a seam free, single sided Crochet Granny square for perfect results every time.

The humble Granny Square is the crochet staple of Nanna's everywhere, which is how it came to be known as a 'Granny Square'. Originally it was just called a crochet square.

The Granny Square is often the very first thing we are taught when learning to crochet, so it would follow that it would be simple to have a perfect square every time and those new to crochet often get discouraged when this is not the case.

However, to get a perfect square actually requires a bit of experience, good fundamentals and advanced row starting techniques, otherwise you are left with seams, the reverse side of stitches showing every second row or even a slight spiral effect.

This granny square is made without turning your work and has a right and a wrong side.

The Two Storey House

The Two Storey House

I don't know what passes for an old building where you live but in Australia this 1870's heritage home is a rare and wonderful sight. 

The Two Storey House

Comments

  1. Ha I thought it looked quite modern.

    Have a very Merry Christmas.

    Thank you for linking up and supporting My Sunday Photo this year.

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  2. I'm with Darren, that looks like it has gone full circle and actually a rather modern design! Lovely none the less.

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  3. I love, love, love old buildings! How strange that they would tile the lower floor instead of building higher. I'm guessing they didn't know about flooding until it was too late?
    The oldest building in my area was constructed in 1917 - And it seems like everything else in the historic register was built in 1927. What's disappointing is there's very little information about any of it.
    To me, there is something extra-special about structures from before the 1900's. Thanks for sharing this one!

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    1. Quite probably they had no idea about the flooding for years, it is usually very dry here.

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  4. What a gorgeous little building indeed

    Mollyxxx

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  5. isn't it a beautiful old place? yes our history is as nothing to the northern hemisphere.:) cheers and happy xmas stella. x

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    1. I had a lovely xmas thank you. I hope you did too =D

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  6. I love heritage buildings especially those with a good story to them. I think we have trouble keeping them in Asia so we are lucky to have a handful still standing.

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    1. It's hard to stop the future but the older areas have such charm and those with smart councils have learnt to capitalise on that here. I hope the old buildings you do have remain into the future.

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  7. Hi Stella, this purfylled my day!! I love looking at historic buildings!
    My Granny lived in a 1920's house, and my cousin helped her get it registered as historical! That was so neat! The whole family reminisces about Granny's house, now that she's gone, and it passed outta the family.

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    1. Nawww, I love that you used purfylled in a sentance almost as much as I love that your family registered Gran's old house to saved for future generations.

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  8. It looks so low, or is that the angle? I love the style of it x

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    1. It is low! The street is much higher then the building. I guess in the 1870's there didn't have earth moving equipment to do something about that.

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  9. Can I just say I love how you Aussies write "storey?" In American English it's just "story," depriving the word of all charm whatsoever.

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    1. It helps us to differentiate between a good tale - story - and a building - storey. I'm not sure in just what context the difference would ambiguous in any case, but there you have it.

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